Setting Up a Home Propagation Station

Even if you don't have a greenhouse or a nursery, you can set up your own at-home plant propagation station with a few simple supplies and not much space! In this post I'll walk you through one way to arrange an efficient and effective plant propagation station.

Our propagation station is one medium-sized table where we keep all the essentials at hand. Here I'll walk you through what I've found to be the best way to set up the space:

-Potting soil mix is stored below the table to save workspace while keeping the soil nearby. Our soil mix is 45-50% black soil, 45% compost (preferably from animal manure), and 5-10% white sane (similar to vermiculite or perlite). It  is important to sift the soil, we recommend a 1/2" screen.
-Vegetable cutting tray (or box) on the table. The tray should be about 6" deep and filled with the potting soil mix. This is used for seeds and cuttings.
-Nursery bags with small holes for drainage at hand.
-Hand tools and other materials to keep on site: pruning shears, kitchen knife, paper or a notebook and pen for taking notes
-Hose with mister nozzle or spray bottle for watering.

And that's it! It's best to set up your propagation station in an area with partial shade and ready access to water. Now go forth and propagate!


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Studying Permaculture and Natural Building in Central America offers amazing opportunities to learn from indigenous cultures, rich natural patterns, and enormous diversity. Permaculture in Central America is representative of the edge effect or Edge Valuing Principle of Design. As one of the world’s centres of biodiversity, Central America attracts people from all over the world interested in learning through nature. Permaculture practices and can be seen in action via the surviving indigenous traditions that are common in Central America. Studying permaculture and natural building in Central America offers designers great opportunities to learn from diverse groups of people in incredibly diverse natural settings.